Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve


 


Koala - Acacia Way - 10 Nov 2017 lowres

Koala Phascolarctos cinereus

By: Michael Fox

 

Walking the Mountain this morning we saw a pair of Sulphur-crested Cockatoos Cacatua galerita high in the trees getting very upset about something. Initially we thought they were getting upset with a murder of Crows in the trees.

Stingless Native Bees Bottle Brush Grass Tree - 10 Nov 2017 lowres

Stingless Native Bee

Then Jude spotted a Koala hanging on for dear life as the Cockatoos and Crows all harried it.

 

In the same area I found tiny Stingless Native Bees Tetragonula sp. collecting nectar and pollen on Bottle Brush Grass Tree Xanthorrhoea macronema flowers.

Look for the pollen on legs.

 

 

Ringtail Possume - dead tree - 10 Nov 2017 lowres

Ringtail Possum nesting in dead tree

 

 

Our last find was a Ringtail Possum Pseudocheirus peregrinus asleep in its nest in a dead tree.

 

 

Ringtail Possum nest in dead tree - 10 Nov 2017 lowres

 

 

 

Dead trees (called stags) are an important part of our bushland habitat providing homes for insects, lizards, birds and even Possums.

 

 

 

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By: Michael Fox

Photos: Andreas Listle

A beautiful Saturday morning and I met up with an inspiring group students for our regular Griffith Mates OWeek guided walk in Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve. I vary the walk each time to highlight plants in flower and other special sights and sounds. A highlight this time was meeting Ma Poss (Brushtail Possum Trichosurus vulpecula) and her joey. (Baby possums are called ‘joey’.)

 

Checking nest box - collage - 28 Oct 2017

Checking nest box with GoPro and excited students watching on the iPad

 

 

 

Meeting at Mt Gravatt Campus the Griffith Mates team introduced students from Germany, South America, China and Japan all keen to learn more about the Australian bush.

The students were very interested in learning about our native ground orchids: Slender Hyacinth Orchid Dipodium variegatum.

Mycoheterotrophy-NewI explained that, lacking any leaves, these orchids are critically dependent on their relationship with fungi in the ground.  The fungi mycorrhiza, fine root like fibres, feed the underground orchid with organic carbon and minerals collected from roots of adjacent trees.

 

These native orchids cannot survive if removed from the bush as they are totally dependent on their relationship with the fungi.

 

 

 

Along Acacia Way we looked at the unusual Bottle Brush Grass Trees Xanthorrhoea macronema in flower. Looking closely we found Stingless Native Bees (Tetragonula sp.) collecting pollen and nectar.

 

Pardalote sign

Pardalote interpretative sign

 

 

Bird song is an important part of any walk in the Reserve.


Blueberry Lily berries
The QR code on the Pardalote interpretative sign linked to a video of a Striated Pardalote Pardalotus striatus singing. I introduced the group to the iconic and cheerful song of the Laughing Kookaburras Dacelo novaeguineae

 

Blueberry Lily - 28 Oct 2017 lowres

Blueberry Lily fruit

 

Along Acacia Way we found Settlers Flax Gymnostachys anceps: used by early settlers to sew bags and indigenous people combined it with bark to make fishing line, Blueberry Lily Dianella longifolia and Native Raspberry Rubus moluccanus.

 

Collage 2 - 28 Oct 2017

Leading guided walks with Griffith Mates is always a pleasure … lots of smiles and laughter along the Eastern Outlook Track.

 

Nat Tree Day 2016 planting - 28 Oct 2017 lowres

2016 National Tree Day planting

 

 

A quick stop to inspect results from the 2016 National Tree Day planting: thickening nicely and some trees over 3 metres.

 

 

Curculigo ensifolia - flower - 31 Oct 2017 lowres

Curculigo ensifolia flower

 

Last stop was the 2017 National Tree Day site.

I showed the natural regeneration in the area where the invasive weed Creeping Lantana Lantana montevidenses was cleared as part of National Tree Day. Nature is very resilient if we give it a chance and the returning natives are strong evidence of the effectiveness of our Bushcare work.

Vicent and tree - 28 Oct 2017 - lowres

Vincent and his tree

 

Vincent took the opportunity to check in on the tree he planted on National Tree Day.

 

 

 

Griffith Mates ... the end - 28 Oct 2017A great walk … everyone seemed to be inspired to return and help with our Bushcare work.

Thanks to Andreas Listle for staying behind the camera and capturing memories.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catchment Champions Award - Oct 2017By: Michael Fox

I have been honoured to accept the 2017 Cleaner Suburbs – Catchment Champions Award in recognition of our work within Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve.

In receiving the award I reflect the efforts of dozens of enthusiastic happy volunteers including Marshal and Liz who work with me on Tuesday mornings.

 

Team 1 July 2017

 

 

 

 

Our Griffith Mates partners join us for regular Fox Gully Bushcare events bringing international students to experience the Australian bush and contribute to our restoration work.
Brains over brawn - 22 July 2017

 

 

 

The Mates willingly join in everything from weeding to moving logs.

david-eve-jess-joylene-charlie-cleand-up-5-mar-2017-lowres

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heather Woods organised Clean Up Australia welcoming a wide range families to join us cleaning up Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve.

 

 

Smiles all round - National Tree Day - 30 July 2017

 

 

 

One hundred and fifty community members worked hard and shared smiles at our National Tree Day event.

On Assignment - 7 May 2017

 

 

 

Member, Alan Moore runs our annual Photography Workshop and prepares our calendar, combining community education and fundraising for equipment.

 

Habitat Brisbane Fox Gully sign

 

 

The Brisbane City Council Habitat Brisbane team provide training, contract support, tools, plants and other resources.

 

b4c logo.JPG

 

 

 

Non-profit social enterprise Bulimba Creek Catchment Coordinating Committee (B4C) provide vital support auspiceing grant applications, accounting and seed funding to launch our Polliantor Link project.

 

 

Thank you to all our supporters and a special thanks to Heather Woods who nominated me for this award.

 

Front coverShare a unique view of Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve with family and friends and support our ongoing restoration work and wildlife research.

The theme of this year’s annual Photographic Workshop was Line and Form. Participants learned to pre-visualise the most simple things in the bush as art … to capture as an image the feeling of being in the bush.

Back

 

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Calendar:    $15ea plus $3.00 post & packing.

Seasons Greetings cards:    $5 cards

 

Boobook box

Purchase calendars or cards:

Funds raised in past years have allowed for purchase of nest boxes like this Southern Boobook Owl Ninox novaeseelandiae box installed at the 2017 National Tree Day planting site.

 

 

By: Michael Fox

Smiles all round - National Tree Day - 30 July 2017

I was so busy on the day I really didn’t appreciate the happy energy of the our National Tree Day until I started looking at the photos. Click on the image to enlarge.

Our National Tree Day event is growing every year with more community members, many groups returning and new groups attending.

National Tree Day 2017 results:

  • 150 participants
  • 500 natives planted
  • 500 square metres of Creeping Lantana Lantana montevidenses removed
  • Dozens of biscuits, apples and mandarins eaten for morning tea.
  • More smiles than you could count.

Community groups participating:

Planting - National Tree Day 2017 - 30 July 2017

The Planting Team in action. Extra plants were ordered however the Planting Team still ran out … next year we will order still more plants, more gloves and more plant shelters. The quality of the planting was also excellent, thank you. Click on the image to enlarge.

Lantana Busters - National Tree Day - 30 July 2017

Lantana Busters in action. We will definitely welcome this team back … look at the huge pile of weeds almost taller than our young Lantana Buster (bottom right). Click on the image to enlarge.
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The final step in site restoration was replacement of the dead timber that was removed to make the site safe for the event. Dead timber on the ground is an important habitat component which allows lizards to move safely across the site as well as providing shelter for insects and food for woody pore fungi.

See more high quality event photos on Facebook.

Thank you to:

  • Fox Gully Bushcare team members: Marshal and Liz
  • Our BCC Habitat Brisbane team Anna: who organised the plants, mulch and hole digging, and Emma: who patiently provided safe road crossing on the day.
  • Alan Moore Photographer

 

 

 

 

By: Michael Fox

Koala 2 - Nathan onramp - 3 July 2017

Healthy young male Koala

“Let me know if I can help lobbying for Koala fencing or wildlife bridges. It breaks my heart to see the good work we have been doing undone so quickly.” Matt

I had just collected a healthy young male Koala dead beside the Mains Road on-ramp to the Pacific Motorway. Fox Gully Bushcare neighbour Miranda had emailed to let me know she had seen a Koala beside to road as she drove to work.

Sadly this young Koala was dead when I arrived so all I could do was collect him and call the RSPCA  Animal Ambulance: 1300 ANIMAL

 

Map - Koala - young male hit by car 3 July 2017

Koala dead beside on-ramp

Matt’s frustration reflects the number of Koala that have been killed trying to cross the Motorway from Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve. Limited wildlife fencing around the Griffith Bus Station and no fence at all on one side of the Mains Road on-ramp (red line) means nothing separates the traffic from the trees on which Koalas are feeding.

At least three joey Koalas were born in Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve in 2016 however I think we lost one of those joeys today.

 

I have previously discussed the possibility of wildlife fencing with Griffith researcher, Cathryn Dexter: co-author of the 2013 Koala Retrofit Works Program report for Main Roads. Cathryn explained some of the many issues in designing and maintaining effective Koala fencing. Also considering we have had a Koala killed on Klumpp Road and a number of car strikes on Creek Road, effective Koala protection in our urban environment will require significant commitment to building wildlife crossings to connect fragmented bushland habitats.

Back to Matt’s question about how to help with lobbying. Create and certify your own Pollinator Link® garden: Water, Food and Shelter for wildlife.

One person or one family may not have a lot of influence, however, every individual Pollinator Link® garden registered contributes to achieving our goal of 30,000 Brisbane gardens by 2022.

The support of 30,000 Brisbane households will give us the influence at local and state government levels to push for more wildlife fencing and road crossings.

You can become a Pollinator Link® Hero by getting ten family, friends or neighbours to create Certified Pollinator Link® gardens and help bring a bit of Australian bush back to Brisbane backyard.

Target 30,000 by 2022

 

 

Southside Environment Award

(l-r) Michael and Alan

By: Michael Fox

 

Alan Moore and I have been honoured with the Southside Environment Award at the Southside Queensland Day Awards last Saturday. The Awards were hosted by Ian Walker MP and Cr Steven Huang with bursary and catering support from the Southside Sport & Community Club.

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Alan - 7 Aug 11

Alan sharing his passion

 

The award is in recognition of our work with Mt Gravatt Environment Group and in particular Alan’s leadership of our annual Photography Workshop. The award came with a cheque for $100 to support our work in restoration of the special habitat of Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve.

The Photography Workshops started with the 2011 Environment and Photography Workshop. The event was sponsored by a BCC Environmental Grant. In the morning Field Botanist – Ann Moran introduced participants to the diversity of our local flora. Then after lunch Alan took over to teach participants to capture the elusive feeling of “being in the bush” as a photograph to put on their wall at home.

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.The Photography Workshops have an important educational role in helping participants value the environment more as they see the bush through new eyes and share their experience with others.

A selection of participants’ photographs are used for the popular annual Photo Calendar. The calendar is sold out every year and provides valuable funds for the purchase of equipment like the infrared wildlife camera used to monitor the Squirrel Glider Petaurus norfolcensis families living in the Fox Gully Bushcare nest-boxes.

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See Alan’s work at:

www.freelargephotos.com

Click on The Photographers then scroll down

find Alan Moore and Click

Contact Alan: editoramcj@gmail.com

 

 

 

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