Team 1 July 2017

Griffith Mates Team

By: Michael Fox

Fifteen happy laughing Griffith Mates joined me on Saturday morning to prepare the site for the 2017 National Tree Day.

See Alan Moore’s “We love Bushcare!” photo series. 

The team members were so interested in everything, from the fruiting Thread-moss Orthodontium lineare to a Huntsman spider on an old pipe, that I thought they must all be environment students. However, they were

Thread-moss - Orthodontium lineare - 1 July 2017

Thread-moss Orthodontium lineare

actually studying everything from business to one special person doing her second Phd in linguistics! They just all love being out in the bush doing something useful.

 

 

 

Most Australians would not be keen on getting up close and personal with a Huntsman spider. Griffith Mates students come from all over the globe … Zimbabwe, Malaysia, China, Japan, etc. and they are fascinated all Australian animals.

 

 

Common Crow caterpillar - 1 July 2017

Common Crow Euploea core

I showed the team a Common Crow Euploea core butterfly caterpillar with its fascinating black curls. The caterpillar was feeding on a Parsonsia vine and I explained that butterfly caterpillars will only feed on a limited number of plant species. If we maintain and increase the diversity of native plants in bushland and in our backyards we can bring butterflies back to our urban habitat.

 

The next find was very strange hairy fungi with a colloid shape with hollow in the middle: Hairy Trumpet – Panus fasciatus. A new species to add to our Flora and Fauna of Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve: over thirty fungi species found in the Reserve so far.

Hairy Trumpet 1 July 2017

Hairy Trumpet – Panus fasciatus

 

Plant signs

Installing interpretative signs

There was also work to do. Two teams went hunting for examples Tape Vine Stephania japonica and Slender Grape Cayratia clematidea and install interpretative signs to show Tree Day volunteers some of the plants that feed our native animals.

.

.

.

.

.

Glass removal 1 July 2017

Site safety – removing broken glass

.

.

.

.

.

Preparation also includes maximising site safety by removing broken glass. Not exciting work but very important.

.

.

..

..

.

 

.

 

Visit Facebook to see Alan Moore’s “We love Bushcare!” photo series that captures the mood of joy and pride of our Griffith Mates student partners preparing for. 2017 National Tree Day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

 

mulch-filter-school-oval-29-nov-2016

Mulch Filter along oval fence

By: Michael Fox

This morning was the final Bushcare event for 2016 and the 80 metre Mulch Filter along the Upper Mt Gravatt State School fence is ready to capture water run-off during the summer storm season.

The current dry weather highlights the importance of keeping as much rain water as possible on site to support the bushland restoration. The school oval represents over 10,000 sq metres (one hectare) of rain catchment available for the Buchcare site.

compost-pile-29-nov-2016

Composting weeds on site

Natural regeneration of Monkey Rope Vine Parsonsia straminea and Slender Grape Cayratia clematidea is already enhancing the on-site composting of weeds. Slowing the water run-off reduces erosion and allows the water soak in to support the natural regeneration.

It is encouraging to see the native vines setting seed ready for the summer growing season.

slender-grape-wombat-berry-29-nov-2016

Slender Grape Cayratia clematidea (left)                     Wombat Berry Eustrephus latifolius     

 

 

 

Roly Chapman - Zone 2 - 27 Feb 2015

Restoration team at work – Liz, Heather, Eloise & Lincon

By: Michael Fox

Our Roly Chapman restoration team has made good progress clearing Guinea Grass Panicum maximum, Sword/Fishbone Fern Nephrolepis cordifolia and Easter Cassia Senna pendula from Zone 2.

Natural regen - Zone 2 - 27 Feb 2015

Parsonsia vine, Creeping Beard Grass, Slender Grape and Native Wandering Jew (blue flower)

Bushland restoration can be slow as breaking the cycle of weeds retuning means removing seeds and roots left in the ground. Seed heads need to be clipped off Guinea Grass then bagged. Fishbone Fern is particularly slow as all the brown fibrous roots need to be dug up and bagged for removal, leaves can be composted on-site.

DSC06230

Marshal chatting to a local Magpie

However, watching the natural regeneration of native species provides inspiration to keep going with the work. Each time we come on-site the Slender Grape Cayratia clematidea, Wombat Berry Eustrephus latifolius, Creeping Beard Grass Oplismenus aemulus, Native Wandering Jew Commelina diffusa and Parsonsia vines are returning where the weeds have been removed.

Restoration of Roly Chapman Bushland Reserve will take another ten or twenty years however with the new cycle path and bridge over Mimosa Creek this is already becoming a special place to walk or cycle.

Water Dragon - 16 Oct 2014

Eastern Water Dragon

Marshal and I took at walk through the Reserve to check out the fungi that has appeared after the rain. Eastern Water Dragons Physignathus lesueurii and turtles can often be seen beside the causeway across Mimosa Creek. This morning it was just a family of Australian Magpies Gymnorhna tibicen. One Magpie was particularly taken with Marshal when he stopped for a chat.

DSC06236

Yellow Fleshy Pore Fungi

.

.

.

.

Some beautiful fungi fruit have appeared, like the Yellow Fleshy Pore Fungi with its charismatic underside with pores rather than the more common finned underside. Click on image to enlarge.

.

.

.

White Mushroom fungi - 27 Feb 2015

White gilled fungi in composting weeds

.

This white gilled fungi is growing out of one the weed composting piles.

.

.

.

Gilled fungi - 27 Feb 2015

Gilled fungi

.

.

.

Delicate gilled fungi.

.

.

.

.

Mushroom cluster - 27 Feb 2015

Gilled fungi cluster

.

.

.

.

.

.

Gilled fungi cluster on stick.

.

.

DSC06265

Laughing Kookaburra

.

.

.

.

.

While we are working we always have local wildlife visiting. Laughing Kookaburras Dacelo novaeguineae and Grey Butcherbirds Cracticus torquatus arrive as soon as we start clearing weeds exposing small insects and spiders.

Grey Butcherbird - 27 Feb 2015

Grey Butcherbird looking for breakfast