IMG_8179

Mimosa Creek in flood – Jan 2015

Edited By: Michael Fox

Saturday December 5th was the last working bee of the year at Roly Chapman Bushland Reserve.

2015 started out very wet with January storms flooding the new bikeway bridge over Mimosa Creek.

.

.

.

IMG_9412

Flood damage repair – straightening and staking

.

After the flood Lomandras have done there job holding the bank in place. However, the newly planted trees are a different story with most knocked flat by flood water.  Liz, Marshal and I moved in to straighten and stake before this beautiful new planting is lost.

Zone 2 - 22 May 2015

Zone 2 – weed infestation May 2015

.

.

.

.

Repairs done our Bushcare team returned to working in Zone 2 to tackle the infestation of Guinea Grass Panicum maximum, Small Leafed Privet Ligustrum sinense, Easter Cassia Senna pendula and Asparagus Fern Asparagus aethiopicus.

.

.

.

Zone 2 - 15 Dec 2015

Zone 2 – weeds gone – natives returning

.

.

Having cleared the larger weed species the area we are working on near the boundary with Upper Mount Gravatt School now resembles a primary forest. In the open spaces, native plants no longer smothered in weeds, are springing back to life. Many Cheese trees Glochidion ferdinandi, free from competition are racing for the sky. Ground covers such as Native Wandering Jew Commelina diffusa and Creeping Beard Grass Oplismenus aemulus are protecting the soil from erosion and keeping it cool, acting as Living Mulch.

Common Flatwing Austroargiolestes icteromelas - 15 Dec 2015

Common Flatwing Austroargiolestes icteromelas

.

As we were packing up and looking forward to morning tea, a delicate Common Flatwing Austroargiolestes icteromelas damselfly with bright metallic green stripes paid a visit, hovering over a small patch of vegetation.

.

.

Koala 13 Nov 2015

Koala Phascolarctos cinereus

.

We now have proof at last that it’s not just Mount Gravatt that is home to Koalas Phascolarctos cinereus. The one pictured here, almost invisible from the path was spotted last month by a dog walker. A mother and baby have also been sighted. This is another good reason to keep weeds at bay. Koalas need to come to the ground and move across the forest floor to look for suitable food trees. Their task is made much harder when there’s a lot of thick weedy vegetation in the way.

Advertisements
Tree falls - Southern Star - 18 Nov 2015

Southern Star – 18 Nov 2015

By: Michael Fox

Susan Jones and I met with a specialist Council arborist today at Gertrude Petty Place Bushcare, to discuss action required to improve public safety for mountain neighbours in Gosford Street.

Balancing public safety and wildlife habitat is always complex. Brisbane City Council’s arborist team have checked the health of trees along the property boundary and identified a number of removal. The team’s assessment was then matched against an independent arborist’s report for confirmation.

Long term safety will be managed by replanting with native grasses and low ground covers. Offset planting to replace trees will be undertaken away from the boundary.

.

.

Koala - Gertrude Petty Place - 23 Nov 2015 lowres

Koala – Queensland Blue Gum

.

Finding a Koala sleeping in a Queensland Blue Gum Eucalyptus tereticornis in another part of the Buscare site, highlights the importance of replacing canopy when trees are removed for public safety reason.

 

 

Koalas - night - Laurie - 11 May 2015

Walking at night look up for Koalas

By: Laurie Deacon

I went walking last night on the mountain with Mike, Liliana and Matt …spotting ….and we saw two Koalas at two different sights as per the map attached.

Koala One was seen at 8.30 pm and was pretty much in same location as were Pieter saw our koala on the March morning walk. At the fork on Acacia Way.

Both were very cute, middle sized Koalas.

Koala one was on the ground beside the track and then when he/she saw us rushed off in the bush and slowly went up a mid-sized straight tree, but stopped and looked at us. She hung around the base of the tree for about 5 minutes. She seemed young, in good health and maybe a girl.

Koala Two seen around 9pm and was sitting high in a gum just about at the top of the Geebung Track where it breaks onto the park area..(currently covered on steel yards for new public toilet construction). She was cuddled up on a long straight branch quite open and the breeze was making her hold on very tight as the branch was swaying. We could not see if she had a clear white tummy as she was balled up. But was looking around.

Was a beautiful night for a star light walk and then a picnic rug for a home baked Honey and Apple syrup cake and candles in the park for Matt’s 25th Birthday.

Best present he said was seeing the Koalas.

Koala mapping - Mar 2015

First Koala sightings 2015

By: Michael Fox

2015 is off to a good start with six sightings of Koalas reported already, and, importantly, the sightings have been right around the Reserve.

Koala - Mt Gravatt Campus - 23 Feb 2015 - Michael McGeever

          Koala – Griffith Uni Mt Gravatt Campus                          Photo: Michael McGeever

The latest sighting was on Sunday while we were doing a guided walk for our Griffith Mates visitors. Pieter Demmers spotted the Koala high in a tree beside Acacia Way. Seeing this Koala in the bush was particularly special for our visitors from Germany, France and China.

Michael McGeever spotted another Koala, probably a male,  just at the entry to the Mt Gravatt Campus

.

.

.

.

Koala - Fox Gully - 27 Feb 2015

Young Koala Fox Gully

.

Then we were woken about 4am last week. A young Koala seemed to be calling its mother with the short squeal – almost a ‘yip’, they use to communicate. I was able to get a photo when is climbed an Acacia near the house.

In 2014 at least two Joeys (baby Koalas) were born in Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve. In 2015 we want to do more tracking of Koalas with the aim of identifying and tracking individuals to help us understand their movement patterns and how to reduce the number killed on the South-east Freeway.

So if you see a Koala, please take a photo – phone camera is ok, note the location and any comments eg. mother with joey or walking along the road.

Sightings can be reported to Koala Tracker and/or emailed to megoutlook@gmail.com.

Exocarpos cupressiformis - 22 Nov 2014By: Michael Fox

Identification of Native Cherry Exocarpos cupressiformis brings to two hundred and seventy-four plant species identified within Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve.

 Mt Gravatt Then and Now, Mt Gravatt Historical Society, records that in July 1883 our local Mt Gravatt community convinced the state government to protect the Reserve which had previously been logged as railway timber reserve.

In 2014 it is our turn to protect this unique high diversity habitat. The 274 native plant species our 66 hectare Reserve is equal to 11% of of all species in Great Britain which is 22.6 million hectares.

Protecting and restoring this habitat is a whole of community effort with Griffith Mates joining our Bushcare teams, Mt Gravatt Kindy protecting their part of the habitat and installing nest boxes  so the next generation learns, Mt Gravatt State High School and Fox Gully neighbours supporting efforts to build Pollinator Link wildlife corridors linking the Reserve to other habitats.

Koalas breeding successfully is one measure of our progress.

Koala Mum & Joey

Koala Mum & Joey

By: Michael Fox

Koala Phascolarctos cinereus breeding season is roughly August to February.

For some weeks we have been listening to the fighting, bellowing, screaming at night and this morning a Koala mum and baby was sitting in an Acacia just beside the Farm Fire Trail.

Koala Life Cycle poster – Australian Koala Foundation

.

Koalas are returning to Mt Gravatt Conservation Reserve. An extraordinary example of the resilience of nature if we give it a chance. As recently as August 1927 over 500,000 Queensland Koalas were hunted for their pelts.

“From 1 to 31 August 1927, Queensland held what was to be the last open hunting season on koalas in Australia. David Stead, President of the Wild Life Preservation Society of Australia, warned that 300,000 would be killed. This figure was ridiculed in certain quarters, but as later events would show, even Stead underestimated the carnage. The Annual Report of the Department of Agriculture and Stock for the year1927-28 gives the number of koalas “secured” as being 584,738.”

Dog off - 9 Oct 2014

Pick-up after your dog

.
Hunting is no longer a threat however in our urban environment dogs are a threat to the returning Koalas. A quick bite, even from a small dog, can kill through infection or shock.
.
My dog would only play with it. Even a quick bite is enough to kill a Koala. A Koala’s skin is very pliable, with little fat for protection, and internal organs are easily punctured. Some Koalas may appear to have survived a dog attack with very few visible signs of external trauma but may be suffering from internal injuries and may die later from shock or infection. Stress alone might also be enough to trigger other problems such as disease.
During breeding season it is particularly important to keep dogs on a leash within the Reserve and pick up after your dog.

By: Michael Fox

I'm partied out ... time for a rest.

I’m partied out … time to rest.

September to March is Koala mating season and Photographer, Alan Moore, reports that on Tuesday night there seemed to be a late night party in the trees behind his house.

Alan identified the sounds of three different Koalas … typically lots grunting, hissing and squealing/screaming.

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

LED LENSER - Alan Moore

LED LENSER P17

.

Photographing Koalas high in the trees is difficult at the best of times. At 11:30pm it is a bit of an art.

Alan uses an LED LENSER P17 torch that can be focused into a power spot light beam. The bright white LED light is ideal for photography even for back-lighting in daytime.

.

Koala3 - male - Alan Moore - 7 Oct 2014

Definitely a male Koala

.

.

.

.

.

“Ok, back to the party. The girls will be missing me.”

If you see a Koala:

  • please take a photo – even a phone camera photo is fine as it provides details of date/time
  • note the location – beside Summit Track or backyard of number/street
  • report to Koala Tracker; or
  • email details and photos to megoutlook@gmail.com

Sick or injured Koalas can be reported to 1300 ANIMAL or Daisy Hill Koala Ambulance